Interview with Fiction Writers Review

Hi all,

Very pleased to mark the publication of this interview with Alden Jones and the Fiction Writers Review. We had a nice discussion about the “genre” of historical fiction, the process of researching Will Poole’s Island, the differences between writing novels and short stories, and more.

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A brief excerpt:

“Here’s the thing about writing historical fiction: you’re not trying to reconstruct or mimic history, which would be altogether boring even if it weren’t impossible. What you’re trying to do is to create a new version of it that will tell a good story while simultaneously capturing something essential, not only about the period, but also about contemporary life.”

Read the complete interview here.

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About Tim Weed

Tim Weed’s first novel, WILL POOLE'S ISLAND (2014), was named one of Bank Street College of Education’s Best Books of the Year. He is the winner of a Writer’s Digest Popular Fiction Award and his work has appeared in The Millions, Colorado Review, Talking Points Memo, Writer's Chronicle, Talking Writing, Fiction Writers Review and elsewhere, and his short fiction collection, A FIELD GUIDE TO MURDER & FLY FISHING (Green Writers Press), is out in 2017. Tim teaches at Grub Street in Boston and in the MFA writing program at Western Connecticut State University, and occasionally serves as a featured expert for National Geographic in Spain and Patagonia. He​ is the co-founder of the Cuba Writers Program.
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One Response to Interview with Fiction Writers Review

  1. Thanks for the share. I appreciate this since your insight correlates to my desire to write fiction in a historical setting. I really liked how you pointed that out. Some story ideas really belong under different genres (some of mine might be better called Gothic Horror) and pigeon-holing them under historical fiction seems like a misnomer. It’s my great fear that when presented with books marketed as historical fiction, potential readers will pass by a story due to the stereotype the name implies.

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